Stath - Netflix

Stath follows the day-to-day antics at 'Michael & Eagle Lets'; a dodgy London lettings agency run by titular character Stath's father, Solaki. It's a real family affair, as equally inept Sophie, Stath's sister, is also employed there on continual work experience.

Stath has big ambitions to take over the family business one day, but is hampered by his general ability and overall personality. In modern, overcrowded London, the business of finding tenants to rent flats should be pretty easy, but Stath makes it a struggle.

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: In Development

Runtime: None minutes

Premier: None

Stath - Old Norse - Netflix

Old Norse was a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia and inhabitants of their overseas settlements from about the 9th to the 13th century. The Proto-Norse language developed into Old Norse by the 8th century, and Old Norse began to develop into the modern North Germanic languages in the mid- to late 14th century, ending the language phase known as Old Norse. These dates, however, are not absolute, since written Old Norse is found well into the 15th century. Old Norse was divided into three dialects: Old West Norse, Old East Norse, and Old Gutnish. Old West and East Norse formed a dialect continuum, with no clear geographical boundary between them. For example, Old East Norse traits were found in eastern Norway, although Old Norwegian is classified as Old West Norse, and Old West Norse traits were found in western Sweden. Most speakers spoke Old East Norse in what is present day Denmark and Sweden. Old Gutnish, the more obscure dialectal branch, is sometimes included in the Old East Norse dialect due to geographical associations. It developed its own unique features and shared in changes to both other branches. The 12th century Icelandic Gray Goose Laws state that Swedes, Norwegians, Icelanders, and Danes spoke the same language, dönsk tunga (“Danish tongue”; speakers of Old East Norse would have said dansk tunga). Another term, used especially commonly with reference to West Norse, was norrænt mál (“Nordic/Northern speech”). Today Old Norse has developed into the modern North Germanic languages Icelandic, Faroese, Norwegian, Danish, and Swedish, of which Norwegian, Danish and Swedish retain considerable mutual intelligibility.

Stath - Vowels - Netflix

The vowel phonemes mostly come in pairs of long and short. The standardized orthography marks the long vowels with an acute accent. In medieval manuscripts, it is often unmarked but sometimes marked with an accent or through gemination. All phonemes have, more or less, the expected phonetic realization. Old Norse has had nasalized versions of all nine vowel places. These occurred as allophones of the vowels before nasal consonants and in places where a nasal had followed it in an older form of the word, before it was absorbed into a neighboring sound. If the nasal was absorbed by a stressed vowel, it would also lengthen the vowel. These nasalizations also occurred in the other Germanic languages, but were not retained long. They were noted in the First Grammatical Treatise, and otherwise might have remained unknown. The First Grammarian marked these with a dot above the letter. This notation did not catch on, and would soon be obsolete. Nasal and oral vowels probably merged around the 11th century in most of Old East Norse.:3 However, the distinction still holds in Dalecarlian dialects.:4 The dots in the following vowel table separate the oral from nasal phonemes. Note: The open or open-mid vowels may be transcribed differently: /æ/ = /ɛ/ /ɒ/ = /ɔ/ /ɑ/ = /a/ Sometime around the 13th century, /ɔ/ (spelled ǫ) merged with /ø/ or /o/ in all dialects except Old Danish. In Icelandic, all /ɔ/ (ǫ) merged with /ø/. This can be determined by their distinction within the 12th-century First Grammatical Treatise but not within the early 13th-century Prose Edda. The nasal vowels, also noted in the First Grammatical Treatise, are assumed to have been lost in most dialects by this time (but notably they are retained in Elfdalian). See Old Icelandic for the mergers of /øː/ (spelled œ) with /ɛː/ (spelled æ) and /ɛ/ (spelled ę) with /e/ (e).

Stath - References - Netflix

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