Reliable Sources - Netflix

Reliable Sources is a weekly show on the cable/satellite news network CNN that focuses on analysis of the American news media. It was initially created to cover the media's coverage of the Persian Gulf War, but has since also covered the media's coverage of the Valerie Plame affair, the Iraq War, the outing of Mark Felt as Deep Throat, and many other events and internal media stories. The show debuted in 1992. Until 2009, it was broadcast as a stand-alone program, but on January 18, 2009,Reliable Sources became a segment during CNN's new Sunday morning political program State of the Union with John King, although it remained hosted by Kurtz and retained its timeslot. In January 2010, after John King left the show, Reliable Sources was re-spun off as its own show, moving back one hour in the process.

Reliable Sources reviews the coverage of the news stories of the past week by the media, in addition to news about the news media behind the scenes, all with a constantly changing group of online, print, and broadcast journalists. The segments also feature some one-on-one interviews with journalists taking part in a news event or covering a story, such as Bob Woodruff after his return to ABC News in February 2007 after his severe injuries in Iraq on January 29, 2006. Bernard Kalb was the founding host. Howard Kurtz had been host of the program for 15 years before leaving CNN to join Fox News Channel on July 1, 2013, where he became host of Media Buzz, which airs opposite Reliable Sources on Sunday mornings and serves as its direct competition. After Kurtz's departure, Reliable Sources used a rotating roster of guest hosts until December 8, 2013, when former New York Times reporter Brian Stelter became the program's permanent host. Since its debut, Reliable Sources has been based at CNN's bureau in Washington, D.C. The show is slated to move to the network's studios at Time Warner Center inNew York City on or around the week of September 21, 2014.

Reliable Sources - Netflix

Type: Talk Show

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 1992-10-31

Reliable Sources - Primary source - Netflix

In the study of history as an academic discipline, a primary source (also called original source or evidence) is an artifact, document, diary, manuscript, autobiography, recording, or any other source of information that was created at the time under study. It serves as an original source of information about the topic. Similar definitions can be used in library science, and other areas of scholarship, although different fields have somewhat different definitions. In journalism, a primary source can be a person with direct knowledge of a situation, or a document written by such a person. Primary sources are distinguished from secondary sources, which cite, comment on, or build upon primary sources. Generally, accounts written after the fact with the benefit (and possible distortions) of hindsight are secondary. A secondary source may also be a primary source depending on how it is used. For example, a memoir would be considered a primary source in research concerning its author or about his or her friends characterized within it, but the same memoir would be a secondary source if it were used to examine the culture in which its author lived. “Primary” and “secondary” should be understood as relative terms, with sources categorized according to specific historical contexts and what is being studied.

Reliable Sources - Forgeries - Netflix

Historians must occasionally contend with forged documents that purport to be primary sources. These forgeries have usually been constructed with a fraudulent purpose, such as promulgating legal rights, supporting false pedigrees, or promoting particular interpretations of historic events. The investigation of documents to determine their authenticity is called diplomatics. For centuries, Popes used the forged Donation of Constantine to bolster the Papacy's secular power. Among the earliest forgeries are false Anglo-Saxon charters, a number of 11th- and 12th-century forgeries produced by monasteries and abbeys to support a claim to land where the original document had been lost or never existed. One particularly unusual forgery of a primary source was perpetrated by Sir Edward Dering, who placed false monumental brasses in a parish church. In 1986, Hugh Trevor-Roper “authenticated” the Hitler Diaries, which were later proved to be forgeries. Recently, forged documents have been placed within the UK National Archives in the hope of establishing a false provenance. However, historians dealing with recent centuries rarely encounter forgeries of any importance.

Reliable Sources - References - Netflix

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